We discover, design, and characterize
the advanced materials humanity needs.

 

At UC San Diego, we leverage our cross-disciplinary expertise to discover, design, and characterize advanced materials needed to address global societal challenges. Our materials work is relevant for developing zero- and low-carbon energy and transportation systems; cost-effective healthcare advances; solutions for natural-resource sustainability; and next-generation information technologies.

 

This work is grounded in our ability to control materials at the level of atoms and electrons.

 

Equally important, we are world-leaders in characterizing the structure and function of materials at the nanoscale level using a suite of cutting-edge analytical and theoretical tools, many of which we have developed here at UC San Diego.

 

Learn more on the "About" page.  
 

Download the IMDD brochure.

 

 

 

Recent News


IMDD Seminar: The Innovation Ecosystem at UC San Diego

IMDD Seminar: The Innovation Ecosystem at UC San Diego

January 25, 2021

Paul Roben, Associate Vice Chancellor for Innovation and Commercialization at UC San Diego, will provide information on how the Office for Innovation and Commercialization can help you translate your reserach from the lab to the marketplace on Friday, February 5.  Full Story


IMDD Seminar: Introduction and Materials for Quantum Communication

IMDD Seminar: Introduction and Materials for Quantum Communication

January 19, 2021

Dr. Bhagawan Sahu from the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry at UC San Diego will give an IMDD Seminar presentation titled 'Introduction and Materials for Quantum Communication on January 28 at 10 am. Full Story


New Method Makes Better Predictions of Material Properties Using Low Quality Data

New Method Makes Better Predictions of Material Properties Using Low Quality Data

January 14, 2021

By combining large amounts of low-fidelity data with smaller quantities of high-fidelity data, nanoengineers at UC San Diego have developed a machine learning method to more accurately predict the properties of new materials including, for the first time, disordered materials. Full Story