We discover, design, and characterize
the advanced materials humanity needs.

 

At UC San Diego, we leverage our cross-disciplinary expertise to discover, design, and characterize advanced materials needed to address global societal challenges. Our materials work is relevant for developing zero- and low-carbon energy and transportation systems; cost-effective healthcare advances; solutions for natural-resource sustainability; and next-generation information technologies.

 

This work is grounded in our ability to control materials at the level of atoms and electrons.

 

Equally important, we are world-leaders in characterizing the structure and function of materials at the nanoscale level using a suite of cutting-edge analytical and theoretical tools, many of which we have developed here at UC San Diego.

 

Learn more on the "About" page.  
 

Download the IMDD brochure.

 

 

 

Recent News


Grow and eat your own vaccines?

Grow and eat your own vaccines?

September 16, 2021

The future of vaccines may look more like eating a salad than getting a shot in the arm. Scientists at UC San Diego, UC Riverside and Carnegie Mellon University are studying whether they can turn edible plants like lettuce into mRNA vaccine factories. One of the challenges with this new technology is that it must be kept cold to maintain stability during transport and storage. If this new project is successful, plant-based mRNA vaccines — which can be eaten — could overcome this challenge with the ability to be stored at room temperature.  Full Story


How a plant virus could protect and save your lungs from metastatic cancer

How a plant virus could protect and save your lungs from metastatic cancer

September 14, 2021

Using a virus that grows in black-eyed pea plants, researchers developed a new therapy that could keep metastatic cancers from spreading to the lungs, as well as treat established tumors in the lungs. Full Story


These fridge-free COVID-19 vaccines are grown in plants and bacteria

These fridge-free COVID-19 vaccines are grown in plants and bacteria

September 7, 2021

Nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego have developed COVID-19 vaccine candidates that can take the heat. Their key ingredients? Viruses from plants or bacteria. Full Story